Fit Foodie 5K Race Review

OK. Recovered and ready to write about the experience. 

 

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Don’t let the arrows or the people walking to the festival fool you. The race started UP the hill.

 

The Fit Foodie 5k, from here on affectionately referred to as FF5K, has been on my redemption list for a year. I had signed up last year (who can beat a $25 entry fee?), but the weekend called for heavy rain. The FF5K was also one of those races I thought would have a very small field and I like getting lost in a large crowd. Figuring it was time to start addressing that increasingly long redemption run list, however, I signed up for the FF5K again for $25 before the prices increase ($55 race day registration). To be honest, the hype for the race sounded quite delicious. “Bites at every mile”, cooking demos, great food….etc… yum-my!

One important fact to mention about this particular race, however, is that everything costs extra…from the t-shirts to the special wine and beer tasting, but for the $25, I was OK with the lack of another technical shirt.

The good stuff:

 

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Great swag and post race treats!

 

There was a pretty decent-sized field of runners of just under 1000. All were welcome runners, walkers, strollers, pets. I find most runners a friendly bunch, however, this particular set of runners seemed friendlier than in some races. There were no corrals, so people lined up where they were. I was quite impressed that the faster runners were much kinder and did not bowl over the slower runners that ended up in the front of the field.

The not-so-good stuff:

 

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Pre-race exercise spot!

 

The race started on a hill. Not only did the race start on a hill, the entire course was much hillier than I had anticipated. What made me think “flat and fast”? A few parents were running with their children, unfortunately several of those children were crying after the mid-point. I saw parents giving piggy back rides, stopping to give their kids a much needed rest. Hot AND hilly is never a great combination.

Bites at every mile? Depends on your definition of a “delicious bite”. We were provided packaged beef jerky at the first mile and a Kind bar at the second, not quite the “delicious” I had in mind.  Frozen mini/MINI smoothie pops greeted us at mile 3.

There was only one water stop, but that is pretty typical for a 5K, but the race started at 8:00 a.m. so the heat was already picking up for the day which made the lack of water a bit hard to handle. I accept responsibility, however, since I chose not to carry a water bottle.

There was little direction at the finish line. I ran across the line, received my medal and followed other runners to the right. I was finally stopped by a very helpful volunteer who re-directed me back to the finisher’s area to get my water and swag bag.

There was no crowd support. Families and friends running together provided their own cheer squads. Strollers and pets were also allowed in the race wherever , they were allowed in intermingle anywhere along the start line instead of starting at the back of the pack.  There were a couple of overly-excited dogs, which made the starting line crush a little challenging.

Post race fair had many free bites including a delicious salad, flatbreads, prosciutto and cheese rolls tropical smoothie drinks and frozen smoothie pops. Very filling! This definitely made up for the “bites at every mile” hype.

Overall, the FF5K Festival was a lot of fun. Tired from improper hydration, I did not stay long, but headed back to the car with my pineapple medal and filled swag bag. The Fit Foodie Race is a pretty interesting race, running up the last hill I tagged this as a one and done, but it might not be. Though I’m not sure why, while it does look like there was more bad then good,  I could possibly add this to my race budget expenditure list.

 

Runner’s World Magazine Review

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What? Where do I get off reviewing a famous running magazine? Full disclosure, I cancelled my subscription to Runner’s World in March when I received the obligatory auto-renew post card, letting me know that my account would be automatically debited in April. I must admit, I have waffled over the decision to cancel for a couple of years now, but the deciding factor were the inserts that fell out of a recent issue that offered the magazine several dollars cheaper than I was about to be billed. I can be cheap like that sometimes, but after a more introspective look at the magazine it suddenly became even clearer to me. I am not their target market.

I think secretly I always knew. I’m not a slim, nimble 20-30 year old elite runner. I don’t have tons of money to buy the latest sneakers, nor to purchase the products that lurk in their glossy pages. Despite their one cover story issue last year of the plus-sized runner, there is very little for me. I’ve learned to stop drooling over the things I cannot have,  nor will ever be (again).  I have none of the characteristics that represent their true target audience.

I was thumbing through one of the last issues, looking for one of their cover stories and came across a story about a Couch to 5K success. It was supposed to be a motivating story about a 42-year old mom with two young boys. She wanted to shed a few pounds so she started with the C25K and now holds a trail run record, despite her busy schedule. She is a lawyer. My average woman-self, with a government job thought…mmm…she can afford things I cannot. I couldn’t connect when I thought of the advantages she would have over my own struggles. How about the advertisement to “Cheat Your Way to Lean”?  Second paragraph, “Last Tuesday was especially hectic, but I’d booked with my $200 per hour personal trainer…” Again, not me. How about Best Foods for Runners? There wasn’t a cheap item on any page.

All of this may sound negative, but it’s really not. I truly believe that Runner’s World has a niche market that works well for them. At my grandma age, I have no desire to be the elite “running with the 20-30 year old” market, nor the well-to-do older set. That is not my reality. I’m basically a barely paycheck to paycheck, grandma enjoying the run. So with that said, it’s important to realize that glossy pages, pretty pictures and well-toned bodies is not something that everyone necessarily needs or wants to see.

Does this mean that I will never pick up another Runner’s World magazine? No, there will still be some occasional interest…a headline that sparks my curiosity. To my friends, in that niche, it is definitely a good magazine for you, lots of helpful advice and exercises you can probably still do. 

I think that one day, someone will come out with a publication aimed at the beginner runners, the slightly over-weight runners, the older runners, the back-of-the-pack runners, the “not in my budget” runners – to let us all know we can still enjoy the sport too. It’s still a great magazine, but I am not their target market and I’m OK with that.

Fast Lane 101 – Jeff Galloway Blogger

JG

Neighborhood tracks are the most convenient place to run for most.  Whether you’re taking your first steps or wanting to improve your time, it’s easy to check your pace by timing each lap. Because I’ve spoken to many runners who mistakenly feel that they are not fast enough to run at the local oval, here are a few simple guidelines:

  • What is the distance of a lap?  Standard distance is 400 meters (@ .25 mile).
  • In which direction should I run?   In most cases, run counterclockwise.  A few tracks alternate direction from day to day,  so follow the direction of the other runners.
  • What lane should I use when running slow or walking?  The inside 3 lanes are reserved for faster runners and those doing speed workouts.  Most runners should use the 2 outside lanes.
  • How do I pass slower runners? Assuming a normal, counterclockwise pattern, move to the right to pass, with a smile.
  • Is it OK for kids to ride bikes and skate on the track? This is not a good idea.  Try to find another place near the track for these activities.
  • Do I have to pay to use a track?  Most tracks are free, but the hours of use may be restricted by the school.
  • Can I run on the track with an iPod? This is up to you but be aware of your surroundings and possible threats or faster runners coming up behind you.  Keep one ear uncovered.
  • Do I need special shoes?  No—you can use the same shoe for road, track or fitness trail—unless you are a competitor doing very fast speedwork.
  • Are there any times that I should not use the track?  If there is a track meet or organized track practice by the local team, find another running area.  Some track teams allow recreational runners to use the outside lane during their workouts.

Say What?
Repeats—These are the fast segments during a speed workout.  Each repeat (usually about 3-5% of the distance of the goal event) is run slightly faster than goal race pace, followed by a rest interval of  walking or slow jogging.  Through a series of workouts, the number of repetitions gradually increases.

The Fix
I always lose count of how many times I’ve run around the track! How can I keep track of it better?  Office supply stores sell “counters” that keep track of the number of laps as you click each time you finish a lap.  Another method: time yourself for the first 2 laps, for two laps in the middle and 2 laps at the end.  Compute an average of the lap times.  You can compute the number of laps by dividing the total time run by the average time per lap.

The Excuse
There are lots of fast-looking people at my track; I’m scared I’ll get in their way. 
 The inside lanes are for faster runners.  If you run in the outside lane, you will not get in their way.

Disney Princess Half Marathon Weekend

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“One and done!” I remember my sister uttered those exact words when she finished her first marathon in January. Pretty much how I felt by the time I finished the Glass Slipper Challenge on Sunday. For those who may not know, the Glass Slipper Challenge consists of a 10K on Saturday, followed by a half marathon on Sunday. I must say I fought signing up for the Glass Slipper Challenge for several years, happily instead, running a 5K on Friday and the half on Sunday, but for some reason I was feeling Iron Woman-ish and decided that this was the year…this was MY year!

A couple of things I have learned in just two short weeks:

1.       (Yes, there will be more than one). If I spend the entire week before the challenge walking an extraordinary amount, my legs WILL actually be tired after the 10K and be too tired for a half marathon the following day. In other words, roaming the  parks probably wasn’t the best idea.

2.       Don’t stop hydrating after the 10K, replacing those fluids lost during a hot 6.2 miles is doubly important. Remember the challenge isn’t over until after the half.

3.       Go easy on the 10K and save some “leg juice” for the half. I was so concerned because I was starting in the last corral of the 10K and not being swept after the balloon ladies, I exerted myself more than I probably should have. I should have saved some of that leg juice energy for the half.

4.       Bring the necessary amount of electrolyte replacements. I was good this time and made sure that I drank something at each water stop, but I ran out of salt tablets, gummy bears and pickle juice by mile ten. I made it all the way, but when I tried to put on a burst of energy to triumphantly race cross the finish line, the dreaded leg cramps set in. So my finish was more of a limp than the Iron Woman moment I envisioned.

5.       Most importantly, have fun. 19.3 miles in two days truly IS an accomplishment and something to be proud of. I finished!

6.       Never say never! My “one and done” mantra, lasted about seven days and I’ve already texted my sisters that I am ready for next year’s challenge. Sore muscles and pain are only temporary, bling is forever.

This year my plan is to not take a three month running hiatus! Training starts today.

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Disney World Marathon Weekend

 

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The path I didn’t run.

Not sure why it took me so long to share my story about Disney Princess Marathon Weekend. Shock? Tired? Not really sure. Perhaps just because it felt sort of like a weird, misplaced weekend for a race I never felt really ready for despite the fact that I trained more in the past year than I ever had on any previous year.

It started innocently enough, pretty much like my annual February junket to my favorite place, except this time I rented a pint-size car for the trip and for a woman standing almost 6 ft. tall, it was constant challenge to maneuver, but it was fun.  Perhaps it was the extra-long, 45 mile per hour maximum speed through all 198+ miles of South Carolina. This was particularly painful since there isn’t a stop light or sign on I-95 for its entire approximately 1920 miles.

I digress, back to the race at hand. I had originally signed up for the marathon, but knew that was not going to happen, so when RunDisney opened up spots for the half, I immediately jumped on it. Most people complain that RunDisney does not give refunds, but imagine my surprise when my transfer was actually approved and money refunded despite the fact it was after the proof of time cut off. The only drawback was I was assigned to corral P because my registration for the half was after the cutoff, therefore my proof was entered after the cut-off. Despite many warnings to contrary about the lack of willingness to allow corral changes, my wishes were granted and they agreed to move me up a corral. Sometimes miracles do happen. A refund and a corral change! What next?  Wrong question.

For the entire week leading up to Saturday, threats of impending inclement weather threatened race day. The forecast called for lightening right around the time volunteers would be setting up for the half marathon.  Despite the fact that we were assured by the many seminar presenters there would be no chance of cancellation (and of course they couldn’t be wring, right?) the lightening started as predicted so the race was cancelled. While it gave me the opportunity to sleep in, it was kind of sad. I was feeling pretty positive about the race and wasn’t even too concerned about the corral.  RunDisney was a champ, not only would we get our medals, but they also offered reimbursement in the form of a free registration to a future half marathon, $180 gift card (the cost of registration), a chance to run the full or even two-one day park hopper tickets. What amazed me is despite their generosity, considering the waiver we all signed about non-reimbursements, people still complained. There were even some that wanted taxes and Active.com site registration fees and travel fees reimbursed.  What can I say…. It takes all kinds.

After the overnight storm, Saturday dawned clear and cold…and what sight did my well-rested eyes see? Hundreds of half marathon runners running the lake around the hotel wearing their costumes and bibs getting the miles in to earn their medal. Hotel guests and staff set up water stations and cheered runners on.  Of course, I couldn’t be like everyone one else (besides I wanted to get in and out of ESPN to collect my gift card).

 

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Sportlegs – Works great!

Sure, I wanted to be different.  I waited after dinner, about 30 minutes after eating a steak and egg sandwich with double fries, to embark on my 13.1 miles in the cold, dark night. My sister came out and ran a mile with me and brought Powerade. I got to watch fireworks in the distance.  It took me forever – possibly my longest 13.1 EVER, looping and looping around the hotel well-lit pathways, the parking lots and the lake. I actually got cramps at mile 3 until my sister gave me Sportlegs which I HIGHLY recommend.

 

My Garmin threatened to run out of battery at mile 12.75, so I stopped and restarted it and ran for another half mile. Even though there were other runners on the lake, it was cold and dark in spots, but I finished. One thing I can say about this medal? #medalearned! Next month? Disney Princess Weekend! Bring it!  Congratulations to my sisters for running their marathon the next day!

 

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#medalearned

 

Saucony Product Review

I’m going to start this post by saying that despite what you may read here, Saucony is still my favorite brand.  They were the first sneakers I was formally fitted for in the Virginia Running Store and have helped me through three half-marathons, numerous 10K’s and countless 5K’s and hundreds of runs in between (not all the same pair as you will read shortly).

So what prompted me to write a review today? Back in October, I was preparing for the Marine Corp 10K and looking down at my sneakers, I decided that I needed to replace the pair I was wearing, despite the fact that I had just bought them a few months before. Now I could see if I was one of those runners who put in miles and miles of miles per week, but face it, I’m not. On a good week, I will put in twenty, most weeks it’s less, so why the problem?

 

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3 months old each

 

As you can tell from the photo, I get toe holes (the new official term). Every single pair, every single time.  Now seasoned runners always give the advice – you need to size up for your running shoes. Sound… makes sense… I get it, they don’t feel tight, but I’ll give anything a try.  I decided to buy a pair of men’s instead.  Roomy toe, the edge of my toes were nowhere near the top of the shoes, running or standing still.  Did I mention that I JUST bought this pair in October? Well it’s the end of December. I’ve been on a couple of 11 – 12.5 mile runs. An 8 miler, a few 10k’s and looking at the toe of my sneak last night….NOOOO!  What is with this brand? Another toe hole developing, this time on a sneaker I have so much room, my toes literally swim. I’m not understanding.  Now three weeks away from the Disney World Half Marathon and I’ve got another hole in the making. What gives?

 

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Men’s pair less then 2 months old.

 

I’ve tried on other brands. Brooks and Asics are too narrow. Hokas make me feel like I’m running on stilts. Nike aggravates my (always lurking in the background) plantar fasciitis.   Why can’t my favorite brand last longer than a couple of months? Who has $100+ to put down on sneakers that don’t last? I’m going to give my favorite brand one more try.  I’m always open to advice though…

 

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My $49 pair 2 years old JUST developing now.

 

I do have to give a positive plug though. I did spend $49 for a pair of Saucony and have had them for a couple of years.  They are the ONLY pair that lasted before developing a toe hole.  I feel there is a message in there somewhere.   

Across the Bay 10K Race Review

atb10k1.pngAnother beautiful day for a race across the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Annapolis, Maryland. Given the logistic issues from last year’s race, I was a little apprehensive on how things would go this year, but this is another race that I’m vested in, and look forward to for the next several years.

The Expo – The ATB10K Expo was held in the Navy-Marine Stadium in Annapolis, Maryland and that is an awesome place to see.  The organizers changed the expo layout up a bit this year so you didn’t have to walk all the way through the expo to pick up your t-shirt. I liked that the expo store was right after the shirt pick-up. The expo is tiny in comparison to the bigger races, but still fun.

Parking – Last year, I paid for a parking in a lot that I was unable to park in, fortunately I was able to find street parking. They also broadcasted the bus issues over the speakers so we were able to hear all of the problems.  This year I was a little nervous not having pre-purchased a parking pass, however, they changed the process so the passes were for designated lots…much more efficient – though nobody actually checked the parking passes when I pulled in.

Race Day – Last year, I thought I left home in plenty of time, but it didn’t turn out well because of traffic and the filled parking lot.  This year, I left home super early, made it to the parking lot in plenty of time and was able to take a quick nap as I waited for closer to my boarding time to get on the shuttle. It was GREAT!

The RACE – This race is definitely unique. Given the location, there are absolutely NO spectators allowed at the start or on the bridge so the only spectators are at the end.  They do have a few “spectators” on the bridge, mostly police officers monitoring the situation and a volunteer every so often.  If you rely on the cheers from crowds to motivate you, this is not the race for you.

The starting area was crowded and not particularly organized.  I was unable to get out of the swell of bodies so I ended up in a corral ahead of mine (8 instead of 9), but no one checked and the crush of bodies prevented me from moving aside, but I noticed  there were several with later corral numbers in the earlier corral as well.

It’s a cup-less race so you have to bring your own drinking devices with you, but there are plenty of water spots to fill up. Also with 20,000 or so people, the race does get very walker-crowded near the end. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a run/walker as well, but I was trying to get a faster time to use for a Disney race so I had to do a little running outside the barricades once off the bridge.

The finish – Great crowds at the end. They changed the off-chute set up this year so they actually had an exit path. The only problem is – nothing to drink but water, no electrolytes. We were handed a Halloween orange-colored swag bag. The bag contained a small bag of pretzels, a small container of apple sauce, a coupon and a handy-wipe. I think some people received a packet of single service crystal light lemonade mix. I didn’t.

I was smarter this time, instead of taking the long way around through the festival or stopping to use the port-o’s, I got on the very short line to the bus to head back across the bridge to the parking lot. Just a quick note, I may have stepped on the return bus at 10:30, due to traffic the bus didn’t get back to the lot until almost 12.

Overall, it was a good race! Definitely on my plans for next year.  3-medals